The Claypool Lennon Delirium cast their curious third eye exploring reality through music with a sold-out show at the Majestic in Detroit.

A full house of psychic warriors fill the Majestic Theatre in Detroit for a night of vibrant colors, thoughtful wit, and cosmic shenanigans with the Claypool Lennon Delirium. The band is out in support of their supercalifragilistic new album called ‘South of Reality’. In a time where snozzberries taste like oranges, we need a dose of the Claypool Lennon Delirium.

Lit in passion purples drifting to pink, the band called Uni uncoil upon the stage. Concocting a cocktail of 70’s glam with progressive glitz, their music beacons you to their Uni-verse. There is no denying the panache and vigor of this band on stage. You also can’t deny that Uni are heavily influenced by Marc Bolan and David Bowie with a splash of Sweet. At times they also bring to mind the guitar forward strut of Spacehog. It took a few songs to win over the crowd who were not quite prepared for Uni’s sexy and sensual performance. However, by the end of their set they had brought the audience into the fold.

As the lights drop, we begin our journey. Our voyage takes us through a violet cosmos of delightful asteroids, planets, and stars. The tribal call of the drums punctuated from thrumming bass introduces the Claypool Lennon Delirium as they cover the classic psychedelic rock anthem “Astronomy Domine” by Pink Floyd. Sean Lennon’s guitar solo echoes the warping trip through a wormhole.

Our evening’s jaunt continues with “Little Fishes” from the new ‘South of Reality’ album. Les Claypool’s distinctive voice and bass wizardry bend space time. The smiles spread across the faces in the crowd are priceless. The bliss of seeing magic performed on stage makes this evening special.

Joining Sean and Les are Paulo Baldi on drums and João Nogueira on keyboards. They completed this troupe of merry pranksters on a quest to take us further. Next up is the wacky tale of rocket scientist and Thelemite occultist Jack Parsons in “Blood and Rockets”. The band then explores the nooks and crannies of the bouncy title track “South of Reality”.

While much of tonight’s show is focused on the new album, the Claypool Lennon Delirium take a few minutes to probe the sonic depths with their cover of “Court of the Crimson King” by King Crimson. This progressive rock masterpiece comes alive as the band channels the greatness of Fripp, Lake, Giles, McDonald, and Sinfield.

‘South of Reality’ is a gorgeous album and this live performance makes it sparkle. Sean will look over to catch a glance from Les as they play the snarky “Easily Charmed by Fools”. The basso profundo “Toadyman’s Hour” trundles by with impossible pomposity. “Cricket Chronicles Revisited” is just what the doctor ordered. However, this magical show may give us all some serious side-effects.

The Claypool Lennon Delirium close out this evening of splendor with the transcendental Beatles song “Tomorrow Never Knows”. The swirling backwards guitars and punchy rhythmic presentation of this tune surely would have made John Lennon very proud. The band steps off stage briefly before returning to give us an encore of “Boriska” and “Southbound Pachyderm”. We left as the cold rain splashed our acid dreams with sharp reality. Thank you Claypool Lennon Delirium for this most captivating evening.

Claypool Lennon Delirium
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Uni
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Majestic
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Event Date: 27-APR-2019

About The Author

Chuck is a native Michigander. He grew up in Detroit, and later Pinckney. He now calls Ann Arbor home. Running is in Chuck’s blood. He has run several marathons and numerous other races. His favorite race is Dances with Dirt in Hell, Michigan. Chuck was first exposed to photography in 7th grade. He has been a photographer ever since, honing his skills shooting landscapes and most recently concerts. In addition to experiencing music from behind the camera, Chuck is a musician in his own right. He has been playing guitar since his teen years. He played in Detroit area metal band, Battalion, recorded two independent releases, and toured. Today when not covering concerts, you can find him online at his blog, Life In Michigan.

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